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M052 CAMERA TECHNIQUES (Shots & Angles)

REVIEW ACTIVITIES:

VOCABULARY:  click links for detailed glossary page:

DISTANCE / SIZE:

  • EXTREME CLOSE UP (XCU): A shot that shows just a small part of the subject's face.

  • LONG SHOT (LS): A shot showing an entire subject AND places it in relation to its surrounding.

  • BIG CLOSE UP (BCU): A shot that shows only the entire head from the chin up

  • CLOSE UP (CU): A shot that shows the entire head from the shoulders up

  • EXTREME LONG SHOT (XLS): A shot where the subject is so small it is indistinct in a very large surrounding.

  • FULL SHOT (FS): A shot that includes the full human body with the head near the top of the frame and the feet near the bottom.

  • MEDIUM CLOSE UP (MCU): A shot that shows the subject from the chest to the top of the head

  • MEDIUM LONG SHOT (MLS): A shot where the subject is distinct, but with considerable head and foot room.

  • MEDIUM SHOT (MS): A shot that shows the subject from the waist to the top of the head

  • THREE-QUARTER SHOT: A shot that shows the subject from the knees to the top of the head

CAMERA POSITION

  • FRONT ANGLEA head-on frontal view makes us feel really engaged with the subject. It’s often used as a subjective shot, where we see the person as if we’re looking through the eyes of another character.

  • THREE-QUARTER ANGLE: With a three-quarter shot the viewers are a bit less involved when compared to Front Angle.

  • PROFILE ANGLE: In a side view its more as if we’re just watching them as an observer.

  • REAR ANGLEA back view can mean several things: we’re seeing them from the view of a watcher; they are ignoring another character, or they are upset and vulnerable and hiding their emotions.

CAMERA ANGLE

  • BIRDS EYE SHOT: A shot with the camera is directly above the scene facing straight down.

  • DUTCH TILT: A shot where the camera is tilted creating stress and tension.

  • EYE LEVEL SHOT: A shot with the camera located at eye level of the subject

  • HIGH ANGLE SHOT (HA): A shot with the camera above and looking down on the subject, tending to reduce its importance or size.

  • LOW ANGLE SHOT: A shot with the camera located below and looking up on the subject, tending to make it seem dominant or powerful.

  • WORM'S EYE VIEW: A shot with the camera directly under the subject, opposite of the bird's eye view.

LENS PERSPECTIVE
  • WIDE ANGLE: A lens or a setting on a zoom lens that minimizes subjects and magnifies apparent depth by filling the frame with a wide angle of view.

  • NORMAL: A lens or a setting on a zoom lens that reproduces a field of view that appears "natural" to a human observer.

  • TELEPHOTO: A lens or a setting on a zoom lens that magnifies subjects and minimizes apparent depth by filling the frame with a narrow angle of view.

SHOT PURPOSE

  • ESTABLISHING SHOT: A long shot which is used to convey the place, time or environment of a scene about to be shown

  • OVER-THE-SHOULDER SHOT: A shot where the camera is behind one subject so the shoulder is visible in the foreground and the face of another subject is in the background.

  • POINT-OF-VIEW SHOT: A camera shot that shows what the character is looking at from his viewpoint.

  • REACTION SHOT: Close-up of a character's reaction to events.

  • MASTER SHOT: Recording of an entire scene from start to finish from an angle that keeps all the action in view.

  • CUT-AWAY SHOT: A shot which is used to show a different view of the main action in a scene.

SHOT POPULATION

  • SINGLE SHOT: A shot which shows one character in the frame.
  • TWO-SHOT: A shot which shows two characters in the frame, used to show emotional reactions between subjects.
  • THREE SHOT: A shot which shows three characters in the frame, usually in medium shots.

FOCUS

  • FOLLOW FOCUS: Controlling the focus of the lens, so that the image of an object is continuously kept sharp and clear.

UNIT RESOURCES:

M052 CAMERA TECHNIQUES




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